//Video: What Are Atoms
Video: What Are Atoms2018-06-26T22:12:08+10:00

The ancient Greek, Democritus asked “What is stuff made of?” He was particularly interested in what matter looked like on a microscopic scale. For example, could we cut a lump of something as many times as we liked? The first number of cuts of this aluminium foil are easy, but then we would need smaller and sharper scissors. Each smaller piece of aluminium looks like the bigger bit before it. This is because the aluminium is smooth and continuous when it’s this size.
The scientific word for stuff is matter, and that’s anything that has mass and volume. Like your desk, or a car, or even you. Even tiny things like hairs weigh something, so that’s matter too.

Democritus knew that some things looked smooth and continuous at first glance, like a beach, but when you looked up close they were actually grainy. There are lots of things like that, such as a building made of bricks, or a forest made of trees, or even the lights of a city. Astronauts see city lights as one big blob of light, but they know that up close there are millions of little lights. So what does matter look like up close … really close. A desk looks like one object to our eyes, but what if we could magnify it a billion times? Would it still look the same, or would it look lumpy?
It would look lumpy. It might look like this if we looked at the desk using the world’s most powerful microscope, an electron microscope. Scientists call these little atoms atoms. In fact, everything is made of incredibly tiny particles called atoms.
The word atom is a Greek word that means uncuttable, or indivisible.

The ancient Greek, Democritus asked “What is stuff made of?” He was particularly interested in what matter looked like on a microscopic scale. For example, could we cut a lump of something as many times as we liked? The first number of cuts of this aluminium foil are easy, but then we would need smaller and sharper scissors. Each smaller piece of aluminium looks like the bigger bit before it. This is because the aluminium is smooth and continuous when it’s this size.
The scientific word for stuff is matter, and that’s anything that has mass and volume. Like your desk, or a car, or even you. Even tiny things like hairs weigh something, so that’s matter too.
Democritus knew that some things looked smooth and continuous at first glance, like a beach, but when you looked up close they were actually grainy. There are lots of things like that, such as a building made of bricks, or a forest made of trees, or even the lights of a city. Astronauts see city lights as one big blob of light, but they know that up close there are millions of little lights. So what does matter look like up close … really close. A desk looks like one object to our eyes, but what if we could magnify it a billion times? Would it still look the same, or would it look lumpy?
It would look lumpy. It might look like this if we looked at the desk using the world’s most powerful microscope, an electron microscope. Scientists call these little atoms atoms. In fact, everything is made of incredibly tiny particles called atoms.
The word atom is a Greek word that means uncuttable, or indivisible.

New Courses

Contact Info

1600 Amphitheatre Parkway New York WC1 1BA

Phone: 1.800.458.556 / 1.800.532.2112

Fax: 458 761-9562

Web: ThemeFusion